AED'S - DEFIBRILLATION
Why Defibrillators for the Business and Home?

More people die from sudden cardiac arrest each year than from breast cancer, prostate cancer, AIDS, handguns, house fires, and traffic accidents--combined. The majority of these victims had no previously reported symptoms of heart disease.

Rapid defibrillation has been identified as the standard of treatment for cardiac arrest resulting from ventricular fibrillation. Nearly 80% of sudden cardiac arrests occur in the home. Fewer than 5% of victims survive largely because a defibrillator does not arrive in time.
Early Defibrillation: Effective Intervention

Every Minute Counts - For every minute that goes by without defibrillation, a cardiac arrest victim's chances of survival decrease by about 10 percent. After 10 minutes without defibrillation, few attempts at resuscitation are successful.

The average response time for emergency medical services in a typical community is 6 minutes. Positive Prospects for Survivors - SCA survivors have a positive long-term prognosis: 80% of survivors are alive after one year and 57% of SCA survivors are alive after five years.
Important Facts About Sudden Cardiac Arrest, Defibrillators and Survival

According to the American Heart Association, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, claiming more than 340,000 people each year or 680 people each day.

More people die from SCA than from breast cancer, prostate cancer, AIDS, house fires, handguns and traffic accidents combined. Nearly 80% percent of all cardiac arrests occur in the home; the majority are witnessed by someone who could potentially be a lifesaver.
Early Defibrillation In Action

The use of portable defibrillators by non-traditional responders, such as flight attendants, security guards, police officers, and citizens on airplanes and in casinos, workplaces, airports, communities and other venues have saved thousands of lives since they were introduced in the mid-1990s.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, striking more than 340,000 victims each year. More people die from SCA than from breast cancer, prostate cancer, house fires, hand guns, traffic accidents and AIDS combined. SCA can happen to anyone, anytime, anywhere and sometimes in extreme conditions.
Public Access Defibrillation

In the early 1990s, the American Heart Association (AHA) issued recommendations for minimally trained responders and laypersons for PAD. Several studies have evaluated the use of AEDs in such programs. One study by Valenzuela et al found that minimally trained security officers working in casinos were able to successfully resuscitate victims of cardiac arrest due to VF through the use of AEDs. When Loyola Marymount University basketball star Hank Gathers collapsed during a game and died several years ago, people were shocked that someone so young and fit could be stricken suddenly and unpredictably. Gathers' death heightened public awareness of SCA and its ability to end a life within minutes, but it also raised questions about who it strikes and why.
Important Facts About Sudden Cardiac Arrest, Defibrillators and Survival

50 percent of men and 63 percent of women who died from SCA reported no previous symptoms of heart disease.

SCA strikes both men and women. The average age of victims is 65; however, many of those who experience SCA are much younger -- many in their 30s and 40s.

Defibrillation is recognized as the definitive treatment for ventricular fibrillation, the abnormal heart rhythm most often associated with SCA. While CPR may help prolong the window of survival, it cannot restore a normal cardiac rhythm.

For the best chance of survival, a shock should be delivered within 5 minutes. For every minute that goes by without defibrillation, a cardiac arrest victim's chances of survival decrease by about 10 percent. After 10 minutes without defibrillation, few attempts at resuscitation are successful.

SCA survivors have a good long-term prognosis: 80% of survivors are alive after one year and 57% after five years.

The average response time for emergency medical services in a typical community is 6 minutes. Studies of persons experiencing SCA in New York City and Chicago, where emergency medical system (EMS) response times are prolonged by heavy traffic and tall buildings, have demonstrated survival rates of 2% or less.

Presently, the national SCA survival rate in the United States is less than 5% largely because defibrillators don’t arrive in time.

The American Heart Association estimates that 40,000 more lives could be saved annually in the U.S. alone if automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were more widely available and could reach victims more quickly.

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